Follow TBR on TwitterFollow TBR on Facebook
   
 
 

TBR Featured Review

Sex, drugs and rock and roll. What more does a novel need?

Be prepared to take a trip when reading When Life Was Like a Cucumber by Greg Wyss. This trip will be unlike any one you have ever taken before. That is unless you were in your 20s, living in the late 1960s and early 1970s on the East coast, USA....read more 

  
 
 
Book By Author:  I Olidya

Passed Change
 
 Passed Change
 
 Poetry
 
  0
 
 

71 poems of drama, fear, hope, pride and hate that highlighted the historic US presidential elections of 2008, the disgusting and tragic world events that forged a national mindset, and the cry that turned into a thunderous demand, for Change. 

 
Date Reviewed:   

10-07-2011

 
Tagline:   

Political poetry that explores America's latest decade of transition.

 
 

Passed Change is a piece of art and there will be some people who will love this book and some who will hate it. The author, Olidya, has tackled the tough genre of political poetry. Political poetry needs to be strong and impacting in order to make its point and the author has some hits and some misses. The book starts with a view of the political climate in 2001 and progresses through time to the climax of the election of Barack Obama in 2008. It is broken into the following sections: Prelude, Dawn, Awakenings, Primaries, Conventions, War and Peace. Olidya, brings the American mindset into play starting with a poem about 9/11 which is quite graphic. The next series of poems show the frailty and knee jerk reactions of the US government implying that they have control, but America is scared. A show of strength overseas for years is full of bravado, but two lines of one of the poems tells it all:

                                “wake to find stars on blue
                                hard sewn with black thread”

The meat of this book of poems is about the internal strife during the Primaries and then Conventions, where alliances and back room tactics are used with a different face at the election booth, the closet majority. Shown in one poem, Olidya asks can this be the end of the "black tax"? Is America ready to accept a new reality, throw out the old guard? Again not an easy subject to write poetry about but he will get reactions from readers to his prose. Throughout much of the book I wanted to hear the author speak some of the pieces as spoken word. It would have made more of an impact. This is not a collection of poetry that makes you feel comfortable, but it is poetry that prompts you to ask questions.

 
 



Author Details

Back to author listing and Review search


I Olidya Author:  I Olidya